Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘global crisis’

On the Hebrew Calender, in the Jewish religion, Yom Kippur, a day of atonement and fasting concludes the week starting with Rosh Hashanah , the Jewish New Year.  It is a week of prayer and celebration, introspection, forgiveness and gratitude the last day of a week of introspection, forgiveness and gratitude concluding with  fasting and atonement onYom Kippur concluding with the blowing of the Shofar (ram’s horn).

Yom Kippur

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Yom Kippur (Hebrew: יוֹם כִּפּוּר or יום הכיפורים‎, IPA: [ˈjom kiˈpur]), Also known as Day of Atonement, is the holiest and most solemn day of the year for the Jews. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Jews traditionally observe this holy day with a 25-hour period offasting and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services. Yom Kippur completes the annual period known inJudaism as the High Holy Days or Yamim Nora’im (“Days of Awe”).

Yom Kippur is the tenth day of the month of Tishrei. According to Jewish tradition, God inscribes each person’s fate for the coming year into a book, the Book of Life, on Rosh Hashanah, and waits until Yom Kippur to “seal” the verdict. During the Days of Awe, a Jew tries to amend his or her behavior and seek forgiveness for wrongs done against God (bein adam leMakom) and against other human beings (bein adam lechavero). The evening and day of Yom Kippur are set aside for public and private petitions and confessions of guilt (Vidui). At the end of Yom Kippur, one considers oneself absolved by God.

The Yom Kippur prayer service includes several unique aspects. One is the actual number of prayer services. Unlike a regular day, which has three prayer services (Ma’ariv, the evening prayer; Shacharit, the morning prayer; and Mincha, the afternoon prayer), or a Shabbat orYom Tov, which have four prayer services (Ma’arivShacharitMussaf, the additional prayer; and Mincha), Yom Kippur has five prayer services (Ma’arivShacharitMusafMincha; and Ne’ilah, the closing prayer). The prayer services also include a public confession of sins (Vidui) and a unique prayer dedicated to the special Yom Kippur avodah (service) of the Kohen Gadol in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

As one of the most culturally significant Jewish holidays, Yom Kippur is observed by many secular Jews who may not observe other holidays. Many secular Jews attend synagogue on Yom Kippur—for many secular Jews the High HolyDays are the only recurring times of the year in which they attend synagogue,[1]—causing synagogue attendance to soar.

I find this week of tradition, feast and fasting, introspection and renewal totally congruent to my personal belief system and with prayers for world peace and resolution of the economic, political and environmental global crisis we find ourselves in.

L’shanah tovah (“for a good year”) to all!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: