What happens when I think too much?

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Balance & Power, Inc. Newsletter

What happens when I think too much?

Overthinking feels helpful at times, but eventually it leads to negative thinking. Therefore, the more I honor my inner cues and take time-outs to relax-recharge, the less I overthink. When we overthink, judgments often become cloudy and stress elevates, causing spending too much time in the negative. It can become difficult to act.

Overthinking is something that can happen to anyone. But if you have a system for dealing with it (see below) you can at least ward off some of the negative, anxious, stressful thinking and turn it into something useful, productive, and effective.

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10 Tips to Stop Overthinking

1. Awareness is the beginning of change.  Any time you find yourself doubting or feeling stressed or anxious, step back and look at the situation and how you’re responding. In that moment of awareness is the seed of the change you want to make.

2. Don’t think of what can go wrong, but what can go right.  In many cases, overthinking is caused by a single emotion: fear. When you focus on all the negative things that might happen, it’s easy to become paralyzed. Next time you sense that you starting to spiral in that direction, stop. Visualize all the things that can go right and keep those thoughts present and up front.

3. Distract yourself into happiness.  Sometimes it’s helpful to have a way to distract yourself with happy, positive, healthy alternatives. Things like meditation, dancing, exercise, learning an instrument, knitting, drawing, and painting can distance you from the issues enough to shut down the overanalysis.

4. Put things into perspective.  It’s always easy to make things bigger and more negative than they need to be. The next time you catch yourself making a mountain out of a molehill, ask yourself how much it will matter in five years. Or, for that matter, next month. Just this simple question, changing up the time frame, can help shut down overthinking.

5. Stop waiting for perfection.  This is a big one. The moment you start thinking “This needs to be perfect” is the moment you need to remind yourself that waiting for perfect is never as smart as making progress.

6. Change your view of fear.  Whether you’re afraid because you’ve failed in the past, or you’re fearful of trying or overgeneralizing some other failure, remember that just because things did not work out before does not mean that has to be the outcome every time. Remember, every opportunity is a new beginning, a place to start again.

7. Try structured “worry time”.  Set a timer for five minutes about the same time daily and give yourself that time to think, worry, and analyze. Once the timer goes off, spend 10 minutes with a pen and paper, writing down all the things that are worrying you, stressing you, or giving you anxiety. When the 10 minutes is up, throw the paper out and move on–preferably to something fun.

8. Stop worrying!! Only 8% of what we worry about is legitimate. (Read More at the Balance & Power Blog)

9. Accept your best. The fear that grounds overthinking is often based in feeling that you aren’t good enough–not smart enough or hardworking enough or dedicated enough. Once you’ve given an effort your best, accept it as such and know that, while success may depend in part on some things you can’t control, you’ve done what you could do.

10. Be grateful.  You can’t have a regretful thought or feel depressed and a grateful thought at the same time! Make a list of what you are grateful for and review it every morning and evening. Try having a gratitude buddy!

Are you distressed, angry, anxious from the US political campaign news?


The news is 24/7.  This has been called the most volatile and distressing presidential campaign in our country’s history. It may even feel like you don’t want to avoid it…it’s almost like being drawn to a horrific accident that you tell yourself you don’t want to see…yet can’t seem to take your eyes off it.  We may  – as can be expected – feel immense fear, anger, sadness and grief that we can’t easily shake off. Continued Here

Have you heard?

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I’m now a regular published contributor to the Huffington Post!
By Eileen Lichtenstein, MS. Ed. | Huffington Post Contributor

What is the #1 Health Risk in America and what you can do about it!

“Researchers at Harvard Medical School have found that women with highly stressful jobs face a 40 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease. The study defined high stress jobs as ones where the woman felt she had little creativity or power to make decisions, despite being expected to perform tasks quickly. Stress levels were often raised because it is quite common for women have several non workplace tasks, including caring for children and aging relelatives.” (Read the full blog at The Huffington Post)

Watch: NY Networking Interview

NY Networking with Dave Feldman: Eileen Lichtenstein of Balance & Power discusses strategies for coping with stress management, worry & anger management issues.
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Eileen Lichtenstein
CEO, Balance & Power, Inc
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